Number of Britons wanting to ditch monarchy SOARS as bitter Megxit and tour disasters bite

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Queen beams brightly as she returns to work at Windsor

A new survey carried out by YouGov for the anti-monarchy organisation Republic between April 30 and May 2 shows 27 percent of the people polled believe the UK should abolish the monarchy. Out of the 1754 adults in Great Britain surveyed, 60 percent spoke in favour of keeping the monarchy, while 13 percent said they didn’t know. 

These results suggest there has been a growth in the support for the abolition of the monarchy over the past few years.

Another YouGov poll carried out between October 2 and November 22 2019 on 4870 people showed 19 percent of those surveyed said Britain should, in the future, replace the monarchy with an elected head of state, suggesting they were supporting a republic. 

On the other hand, 65 percent of the people polled spoke in favour of retaining the monarchy and 15 percent didn’t choose either option, saying they didn’t know. 

Much like on the year prior, the YouGov survey carried out between March 5 and October 4 2020 on 3127 people also asked those polled the question ‘Do you think Britain should continue to have a monarchy in the future, or should it be replaced with an elected head of state?’

royal family popularity yougov poll ditch monarchy meghan markle prince harry queen

A new poll suggests more people in Britain support the abolition of the monarchy (Image: GETTY)

royal family popularity yougov poll ditch monarchy meghan markle prince harry queen

The Queen is reportedly experiencing mobility issues (Image: GETTY)

Signalling a growth in the support for republicanism when compared to the data gathered the year before, 22 percent spoke in favour of an elected head of state.

The percentage of people who replied they didn’t know was 13 percent, while the number of those supporting the monarchy remained stable at 65 percent.

A further growth in people speaking in favour of an elected head of state was seen in another poll carried out once again by YouGov between March 12 and May 7 last year.

Out of the 4997 people polled, 61 percent voiced support for the monarchy while 24 percent spoke in favour of an elected head of state, with 15 percent saying they didn’t know.  

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royal family popularity yougov poll ditch monarchy meghan markle prince harry queen

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry are no longer senior royals (Image: GETTY)

The most recent YouGov poll conducted for Republic also suggests the younger generations are more likely to support republicanism.

A whopping 40 percent of the people polled aged between 18 to 24 said the monarchy should be abolished against 37 percent of those who said Britain should keep the monarchy.

The percentage of those in favour of republicanism diminished as the age of the respondents grew.

Among those aged 25 to 49 the percentage of people wanting to abolish the monarchy fell to 29 percent.  

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royal family popularity yougov poll ditch monarchy meghan markle prince harry queen

Prince Andrew is the Queen’s second son (Image: GETTY)

It decreased to 28 percent when considering the age group 50-64 and dropped to 16 percent when considering the opinion of people aged over 65. 

Commenting the result of the poll, Republic CEO Graham Smith said: “The Queen is the monarchy, the monarchy is the Queen and it’s the Queen who continues to sustain support for the monarchy.

“That’s a huge problem for the royals, because at some point in the next few years she will no longer be there to keep the show going.

“As we approach the jubilee it’s time the country started to have a serious debate about the monarchy, what it’s for, what it represents and what democratic alternatives are on offer. 

royal family popularity yougov poll ditch monarchy meghan markle prince harry queen

The Queen at the funeral of Prince Philip (Image: GETTY)

royal family popularity yougov poll ditch monarchy meghan markle prince harry queen

Prince William delivering a speech at King’s House during the royal visit to Jamaica (Image: GETTY)

“I am confident that sooner than most people might expect, a majority of people in this country will want the monarchy gone.” 

Over the past few years, the monarchy has been hit by a number of issues. 

In November 2019, Prince Andrew stepped back from public duties after his disastrous interview with Newsnight focused on his association with Jeffrey Epstein. 

In August 2021, Virginia Giuffre launched a lawsuit against the Duke of York, accused of sexual assault against her when she was 17. 

After New York Judge Lewis A. Kaplan ruled against throwing out the case as requested by the royal’s lawyers in January this year, Andrew – who has vehemently denied any wrongdoing since the allegations against him first emerged – returned his military and royal patronages to the Queen and Buckingham Palace announced he would continue not to carry out royal duties. 

royal family popularity yougov poll ditch monarchy meghan markle prince harry queen

Key events in the life of the Queen (Image: EXPRESS)

One month later, the Duke and Ms Giuffre reached an out-of-court settlement – which did not represent an admission of guilt by the Duke. 

In January 2020, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex announced their intention to carve out a progressive new role for themselves within the Royal Family, a model which would have seen them becoming financially independent from the Sovereign Grant while still carrying out royal duties and visits. 

After this solution was not deemed workable by other senior royals, Meghan and Harry officially stepped down as full-time members of the Firm at the end of March that year. 

Their exit, dubbed Megxit, marked the loss for the Royal Family of two working members particularly popular across the Commonwealth. 

During 2021, Meghan and Harry made a number of bombshell claims against the Royal Family, including allegations of racism and neglect during their interview with Oprah Winfrey. 

royal family popularity yougov poll ditch monarchy meghan markle prince harry queen

Sophie and Prince Edward toured three Caribbean nations in April (Image: GETTY)

Last year was difficult for the Queen also on a personal level, as her husband Prince Philip died in April – just weeks before he could turn 100. 

In October, Her Majesty was also advised by her doctors to cut her workload for an undisclosed issue, and is currently mostly carrying out engagements behind palace walls. 

Moreover, the return of royal tours abroad was not an undisputed success, as the trips to the Caribbean of both the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and the Earl and Countess of Wessex were marred by protests, calls for slavery reparations and PR missfires.  

During a meeting with Jamaican Prime Minister Andrew Holness, Kate and Prince William were also told the Caribbean nation is “moving on”, a hint the country may soon decide to cut its ties with the Crown and become a republic.