William praised for ‘appropriate action’ after Kenyans petitioned Duke over land evictions

The Duke of Cambridge was the recipient of a letter this week penned by a group that won support from the United Nations for its campaign against British actions during colonial rule. The letter saw more than 100,000 Kenyan citizens petitioning the Royal Family for an apology and reparations following “brutal” atrocities committed during the colonial period.

It was written by Joel Kimutai Bosek, a Nairobi-based lawyer for the victims from the Kipsigis and Talai tribes in Kericho County.

The letter reads: “We do not want this to become a bitter dispute – we just want the wrongs committed against us to be recognised.

“An apology and a discussion about reparations would be the start to achieve justice.”

Representatives from Kenyan tribes petitioned William to help in the dispute and said the country is a “special place for you and your family”.

It was written by Joel Kimutai Bosek, a Nairobi-based lawyer for the victims from the Kipsigis and Talai tribes in Kericho County.

The letter reads: “We do not want this to become a bitter dispute – we just want the wrongs committed against us to be recognised.

“An apology and a discussion about reparations would be the start to achieve justice.”

Representatives from Kenyan tribes petitioned William to help in the dispute and said the country is a “special place for you and your family”.

They cite this because Kenya is the location where William proposed to the Duchess of Cambridge and was also where the Queen was at the time she learned she’d acceded to the throne.

Petitioners claimed Kenya’s “colonial past” was also the Duke’s, adding: “Where we inherited the pain, you inherited the profit.”

The campaigners make reference to the Kipsigis and Talai peoples, who were forced off their land in Kericho county by the British army between 1895 and 1963.

The move saw ancestral lands being turned into profitable tea plantations.

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However, it is understood that he has forwarded the letter to the Foreign Office because it concerns a matter of foreign policy.

Richard Palmer, the Daily Express’ royal correspondent said in a tweet: “Kensington Palace isn’t commenting but I understand the Duke of Cambridge has forwarded this letter to the Foreign Office.”

He described this as an “obvious way” to handle the matter, adding that “saying this is not a matter for me, please can you deal with it, is certainly better than just ignoring the letter.”

In response, royal fans praised the Prince for taking the “appropriate action”.

A fan page for the Cambridges called ‘Loveforcambridg’ wrote: “It’s the best he can do! He isn’t the Monarch or the next one and all of them work for the government! He did the right thing as always!!”

While royal fan Toria wrote: “Exactly where OG letter should have gone. The horrors ought to be addressed.”

Another called Alix agreed with this sentiment, writing: “That’s where the letter should have been sent in the first place, but that wouldn’t have gotten the media’s attention.”

A fourth, with the screen name ‘CountessCommonwealth’ wrote: “Probably because it’s not William’s place to comment or manage this, despite your attempt to frame this as something he should be responsible before. He took the only appropriate action available.”

While Kathryn M. Clark chimed in to say: “Well done @KensingtonRoyal” before adding that the Duke “understands that these issues need to be addressed by the appropriate people, UK’s Foreign Office.”

The letter was sent to Prince William by the legal representatives of the Kenyan victims on Wednesday, while the group was in London meeting with MPs and civil society.

The group claimed the government had refused to engage with them over the matter, and that the Foreign Office had denied their request for a meeting this week.

This letter marks the latest in a series of recent reparation appeals to the Royal Family from Commonwealth countries.

Prince Edward and Prince William faced calls for slavery reparations during their platinum jubilee tours of Caribbean nations.